Excerpt from United States v. Jean, No. 5:15-cr-50087

Blacklist is a series of public documentary film screenings and accompanying panel sessions thematically grouped around the significant societal and environmental challenges of our time. Themes include (yet are not limited to) Militarisation of Police, Automated Systems and Artificial Intelligence, Mass Surveillance, 21st Century Fascism, Over-consumption, The 6th Mass Extinction, Food Security and Climate Change.

Each screening comprises a single newly-released documentary film and panel of four to six guests whose members are considered experts and/or activists closely related to the (given) theme. It is the goal of this panel to address tensions, challenges and mitigation strategies following the screening, inviting debate and discussion to the ends of encouraging engagement.

In short, Blacklist aims to bring attendees in contact with activists around themes already important to them, stimulating their own 'latent activist' to get involved toward the ends of enacting positive change.

The theme of a Blacklist event is prescribed by parent Black Sheep events, occurring a week before; the initiative of Ziya Tong, they comprise private, ad-hoc screenings to activists in cities worldwide. It is at a Black Sheep event that activists volunteer to attend and publicly engage audiences at a followup Blacklist screening.

Blacklist is the project of Manon Bernard, Julian Oliver and Crystelle Vu.






BLACKLIST #1

Militarisation of the Police

Occurred Feb 8, 2017, Spektrum, Berlin

PANELISTS

Angela Richter - author, theatre director and activist
Adam Harvey - counter-surveillance artist, machine-vision expert and activist
Matthias Monroy - author, researcher and activist. NETZPOLITIK, editor of CILIP
Lukas Theune, civil rights activist, lawyer for Rigaer 94.

Moderated by Julian Oliver artist, critical engineer and activist

"An urgent and powerful exploration of the rapid militarization of the police in the United States. Starting on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, as the community grapples with the death of Michael Brown, DO NOT RESIST - the directorial debut of Detropia cinematographer Craig Atkinson - offers a stunning look at the current state of policing in America and a glimpse into the future. The Tribeca Film Festival winner for Best Documentary puts viewers in the center of the action - from a ride-along with a South Carolina SWAT team and inside a police training seminar that teaches the importance of "righteous violence" to the floor of a congressional hearing on the proliferation of military equipment in small-town police departments - before exploring where controversial new technologies including predictive policing algorithms could lead the field next."

- Katie Atkinson





Supported by:



Background image: National Reconnaissance Office, 2013 Trevor Paglen